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laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to democracynow.org. this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
. >> when lincoln was debatings baiting about the future of the country, lincoln studied the deck la ragsz of independence. lincoln with his thinking about america on the declaration of ind pen accidence. not yes on the constitution, but more fundamentally on the declaration. it's obviously what the civil war was about. this was lincolnesque in the sense that he was applying -- barack obama was applying the thinking about the unity of the country in the dignity of all men and women to the problems he faced today in saying there's a role for the union, if you will. don't forget, lincoln talked about the union, there's a role for the union, there's a role for all of us, together, to solve the problems that we all face. and that was the lincoln part of it. this came, and there's a big conflicting. we the people believe that ea enduring security do not require through perpetual war. who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. and we must carry these lessons into this time as well. i think he's talking about iran. the one war that you face within the next few moblts. . >> you may very
king jr., and another bible, the one belonging to president lincoln. and then later on, as the parade was about to begin, the first family, a modern scene here. dad on his blackberry, the girls snapping pictures on their iphones. all day long, abc's david muir has been following this, he was there at the capitol watching history on parade this morning. we begin you with, david. >> reporter: diane, good evening. you're right. we were just a few steps away from the president, with his hand placed on those two bibles. authorities here in washington were estimating 600,000 to 800,000 people would turn out to the national mall to watch this swearing in. but tonight, we just learned from the inaugural committee, just like four years ago, that crowd might have surpassed a million. at the white house, a salute to the president, who was about to be sworn in before the nation. first, that 1.7-mile trip to the capitol. ahead of the president, on the west front of the capitol, a former president and the secretary of state. cheers on the national mall for the clintons, mrs. clinton looking better
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, saveunbornlives.org and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
are following a lincoln town car they thought that was suspicious. they stopped the car. one thing leads to another. a couple gang bangers in the car. lo and behold, the gun gets c's, a glock nine-millimeter pistol. because of the good process is still in place, that gun goes right to the illinois timeout, testfired and the test fires search through the database and this time there is a hit, a match. now police now attack nics from from that lincoln town car ways that gun used to kill bloomberg eight years before. the problem is that the people driving that car in possession of that gun eight years before were probably 10 or 11 years old they couldn't reach the pedals of that lincoln town car. frankly i have a problem reaching the pedals on a lincoln town car myself. but what's happened here is police depended on information and data available to them from the inside of the gun, the ballistics data to determine what crime that gun was used to commit. but now they were stymied. so what do they do? they turned to the outside of the gun. they made models hillier number, nomenclature, descri
-- was a terrible -- he's kind of like lincoln in a way -- are you for slavery or are you not? because he's trying to keep the border states in line. he was terrified that if he ceded the black delegation that the white democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've
and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and looked, that was astounding. 23 seconds he stood there and he gazed out at the national mall to let it sink in. it must have been an extraordinary day for him. what does today hold for him after that full night of dancing he had? >> reporter: he heads to the national cathedral. the day after inauguration, the presidents always get a chance to go sit down at an interfaith service, a prayer and prayers are given not only for the president but also the vice president for their second terms. this is historic event that d
lincoln, and the other by martin luther king jr., known for his civil rights and anti-poverty activism. the inauguration comes on january 21, the federal holiday in honor of the civil-rights leader who delivered his i have a dream" speech 50 years ago the lincoln memorial. he has addressed the issue of martin luther king and poverty before in 2011 when he spoke at the dedication of the martin luther king monument at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools
honoring king and his favorite president abraham lincoln. >> fate of human dignity in our hands, now, now, now. >> reporter: mr. obama will place his hand on two bibles, one that king used, one that lincoln used. ♪ then it's the parade. the route has been secured. the floats are ready to roll down pennsylvania avenue ♪ this girl is on fire >> reporter: while there will only be two inaugural balls they are star studded. alich gentleman keyes, brad paisley and jennifer hudson. ♪ but you never -- >> before all the pomp and parties, the president took part again in what he calls the national day of service. >> this inauguration should also be an affirmation that we're all in this together. >> reporter: so the first family grabbed paint brushes at a local elementary school. already the people's lawn is seeing plenty of visitors. >> we love president obama. whoo! >> reporter: i got to tell you there were a lot of phobes out last night already having a good time. they've got a couple more nights to go here in washington waugh. the official ceremony is actually starting in just another hour
much in the tradition of king and of lincoln and he has rallied his base. we'll be talking in the next few days about all the negatives and the negative reviews are coming in. today is the day for president obama. this is a day when he really defined what he believes fundamentally. >> david, do you think this is, someone said this is a speech he wished he could have given four years ago but wasn't able to. how did he seem to you? >> i thought it was a marvelous speech and it is brave and it is bold and i think it will play well in history. not enough people are talking about the climate change. there was a healthy paragraph in there about that. 30, 40 years ago, the fact that he took an inaugural speech and used that kind of time and talked about climate is important and just making seneca and selma and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he
in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress today. we must remember the pastor and preacher, and my father was such a healing lead eer, and so
. and then another. and then another. he gave them a quick -- a completely inebriated inaugural address. lincoln was mortified. i unfortunately for johnson, it sets a public image of the andrew johnson. another burly disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge as vice- president. he used his address to tell the senate how they should operate. it set him off on a bad -- starting in 1937, that is when the congress started before the president. now president and vice presidents are sworn outside on the steps. the vice president lost his chance to give an inaugural address. there was one exception in that long tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision.
complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king and president obama. dr. reverend walker who chaired dr. king used to always remind me of his favorite kwoet from dr. king. he would say you measure not a man by the way he is stands in time of convenience, but where he stands in the times of controversy. the president, now dr. king and even lincoln before. they stood in the most controversial and perilous times. people that show leadership and stability and vision and commitment when it's the most difficult of times. any one can shine when everything is going well. but it's when it is the darkest that we can see those that really bear the brightest lights. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> hey, lance, tell us something we don't know. let's play "hardball. "hardbal. >> good evening. let's start with this. lance slide. it's not like we didn't see this coming for a long time. extra power or linebacker hoping for some extra muscle. no, lance armstrong was an international hero. a seven time-tour de fra
the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote. there's a second sentence to lincoln's quote. the first is without public opinion, nothing can happen. with it, everything. then he said, sentiment goes deeper than he who makes laws. i think the second term what he understand from the first term is he was inside washington too much. you have to use the bully pulpit. you have to get out among the people. you have to mobilize. he has a base out there, a coalition that voted for him, pretty actively came to the polls. and the best presidents have been able to mobilize pressure from the outside in. and what four years has told him, maybe he's tried to get republicans over. some of them don't come. he should keep trying. and he has to really keep trying with the democrats. i agree. those are the ones he should schmooze. whatever that word is. >> don't pretend you don't know it. >> richard, i want to pick up on that point. >> although that sounds very good, of course there is the world that comes knocking. and the world is going to come knocking a lot. >> we'll tal
]. >> this was not lincoln, although lincoln's second inaugural is referenced early on in the speech. that was in the middle of the civil war when lincoln gave that. this is not f.d.r., we have nothing to fear but fear itself, in the middle of the gr"great depression." a speech on social justice and injecting into the main fabric of american history and seneca falls and what that meant in 1948, civil rights movement and equality and inject seneca falls and mentioned women about three different times, mentioned stonewall, which when i went to graduate school here at georgetown, stonewall was considered lefty history not in the main fabric of the mainstream books, he threw stonewall in there as if it was a military battle site. and then selma. i thought that made it a historic speech. i can see why the republicans aren't that happy with it. it did seem to be a speech that appealed to the base largely. those reasons and then finally climate, joe, the president not talking about climate in '12, in debates climate didn't come up. the journalist never asked one climate question. i think 50 years from now, climate
just jacksons. you can get washingtons and lincolns, too. >>> good morning. i'm john muller, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm paula faris. in his much-anticipated interview with oprah winfrey, lance armstrong called himself a flawed character. he also said he deserves condemnation after more than a decade of lying about using performance-enhancing drugs. >> as neal karlinsky reports, armstrong described cheating as part of his job. >> reporter: even though we knew it was coming, hearing lance armstrong saying it out loud was surreal. >> did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> reporter: so, why admit it now? armstrong blamed the momentum of his own story. >> this is too late. it's too late for probably most people. and that's my fault. you know, i've used this situation as one, big l repeated a lot of times. >> lance armstrong just confirmed he's tour de france win. >> reporter: the icon who transcended sports, hung around wit
's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrait. does that look like the face of a man that's lost hope for the future? after losing congressional supp
him from a distance. i try tried to get as close as i could so i got to the foot of the lincoln memorial but the notion of this 19-year-old that i would actually shake hands with him, that would have been the thrill of my life. i only saw his. >> twice and both times i saw as a member of the crowd. he came to ucla when i was a student there and spoke so that was the other time in 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? you have this long journey on the way home. >> guest: i didn't have a right back. i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i had a bus ticket that only went back to indianapolis. so then i just had to hitchhike and i hitchhiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: of course i was but his 19-year-old you can do anything. >> host: you think you're invincible. how did that speech that day impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? you talk to stokely afterwards. >> guest: well know, before. not afterwards. probably three years before i talk to him and by that time he had become -- in 1963 he was not
of the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19-year-old that i would even shake hands with him, that could have been the thrill of my life. i saw him speak twice and both times i saw him as a member of the crowd. it was the other time maybe 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? >> guest: i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i have a bus tickets that went back to indianapolis so then i just had to hitchhike and i just hiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: as the 19-year-old you think that you can do anything. >> host: how the hearing dr. king's speech that the impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? because you talk to him after. >> guest: before, not after. it was probably three years before i talked to him again. by that time he had become -- in 1963 he wasn't a well-known figure. 1966 he had black power so that is the next time we got back in touch with each other again and from that point on i stay in touch with him for the rest of his life. >> host: we are going to talk about him more because stokely carmicha
. the land of lincoln float features american flags, the state flag, and a panorama of the capitol. the state seal adorns the front of the float. the float is approximately 20 feet long, 8 feet wide -- >> the south shore drill team from chicago. the president's hometown. the first lady's hometown. they've come here. two major gifts allowed them to come here. from walgreens. they raised the money. they are here. attending this inauguration. you can see the president, he's pretty excited to see what's going on. >> special because they were unable to attend the first inauguration because of lack of funds. so this is very special for them this time. >> they're going right in front of the reviewing stand right now. you see the president and the first lady. the vice president. >> there's a huge set of speakers heading our way. we'll see that right behind them. >> they're moving. >> here we go, here we go. >> the president's moving too. >> how can you not? >> that's right. ♪ >> the south shore drill team from chicago, illinois. ♪ ♪ >> the gullahgeecheee is representing the culture of the islan
it is in getting there, it doesn't matter. >> cenk: i get that point. if you watch lynn lincoln, it's not like the 13th amendment is pretty. i'm thrilled with the progressive ending, don't get me wrong. some people are less than thrilled to seeing president obama using martin luther king jr.'s bible. >> when i got the news that my dear brother, barack obama was going to hut his precious hand on martin luther king jr.'s bible, i got upset. >> brother martin luther king jr. what would you say about the new jim crow? what would you say about the industrial complex, what would you say about the invisibility of so many of our prisoners so many of our incarcerated, especially when 62% of them are there for soft drugs but not one executive for the wall street bank going to jail. [applause] not one. ! martin doesn't like that. not one wiretapper not one torcher under the bush administration at all. then what do you say about the drones being dropped on our precious brothers and sisters in pakistan somalia and yemen. >> cenk: dr. cornell west said that on thursday in poverty in america panel. chris, do
gingrich sat on the couch. the health care plan is based off the 1993 bob dole and lincoln chafy health care plan, and you can go on and on down the list like that. that's what i thought was interesting to e.j.'s point. this was not really a speech about what obama wants to get done next. it was about making a philosophical case for what obama and america has already done. somewhat what i think is unusual is an enormous amount of it and -- >> already one day in. >> already unusual one day in. i want to make this sweeping statement early on here. >> please do. that's what we trade on the show. >> it will be dedicated to consolidating the achievements of his first term. getting universal health care done was a big deal, but it hasn't happened yet. it will happen almost entirely many his second term sxshgt same can be said for dodd frank, and the same can be said for the mooumt put into place when he began to endorse gay marriage, and you also saw, of course, it moving across the state. there's a lot happening now that has already happened statutorily or in public opinion, and obama is com
, with his being recognized through me and i am so thankful for that. >> the president will use lincoln's bible and the bible of dr. king as well on inauguration ceremony. and i always think of that as sort of, a cycle, right, in a way, a virtuous cycle, martin luther king jr., assassinated trying to create what i think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to hi
recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is h
. no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had they all attended, they would have joined not only nancy prksz pelosi and harry reid but tommy lee jones. as tip o'neil said, love the sinner, hate the sin. we need to get back to a time when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neil. there's no shortage of parties planned
amendment and thank you for invoking the words of abraham lincoln. >> this amendment increases funding to the national cemetery association account by $1 million, offset by reductions in the s.b.a. disaster loan program. as i understand it, the the gentlewoman from has heard from her constituents that these additional funds are needed to address extensive tree damage in new york and new jersey national cemeteries. v.a. cemeteries, our national shrines are a lasting tribute that commemorate veterans' service and sacrifice. the amendment will ensure that the cemeteries affected by hurricane sandy will be repaired in a quick and efficient manner and i urge all members to support this amendment and i yield back. ms. velazquez: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from new york. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it and the amendment is agreed to. . pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in par
, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while the number of official parties was scaled back from ten official parties four years ago to two official parties last night, there was no shortage of big stars and big moments, 21 acts, inuding jennifer hudson, alicia keys, stevie wonder, performed at two inaugural events. brianna keilar live in d.c. >> good morning, soledad. only two balls, but there were still tens of thousands of party goers who attended them. took over the huge washington convention center. and when it came to the entertainment, they were not disappoi disappointed. s. >> ladies and gentlemen, my better half and my dance partner, michelle ob
even more than the japanese. >> from the lincoln memorial as we continue bringing shots from around the nation's capital today on this inauguration weekend. what you are looking at are a group of fifth grade students from watkins elementary school here in washington, d.c. for the annual reading of dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. >> and this will be the day. this will be the day when all of god's children. let freedom ring. if america is to be a great nation this is to come true. >> [inaudible] >> let freedom ring from pennsylvania. >> let freedom ring from the snowcapped rockies of colorado. >> let freedom ring in california. >> [inaudible] let freedom ring from lookout mountain and tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill in mississippi. >> from every mountainside, let freedom ring. stannic and when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring from every village, every hamlet, every state and every city. >> we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men, white men, jews and gentiles, protestants, catholics will be able to join hands and
. >> it is the one abraham lincoln took the oath on. and he used it in his last inauguration. he will also use a bible that belonged to dr. martin luther king jr.. >> the president has invited several special guests to attend today's ceremony includes merley evers williams. she is the widow of medgar evers. the first lay woman to give an invocation at a presidential inauguration. >> also attending the ceremonies will be richard blanco. the first hispanic and openly gay person to deliver the poem. center around the idea of the american experience. >> and the reverend lewis leon will deliver the benediction. this is the pastor's second appearance at a presidential inauguration. he's delivered the invocation at george bush's ceremony back in 2005. >> all right. spectators at the event should prepare for tight security. more than 2,000 officers will be in dc today making sure everything goes smoothly. some are going to work with metro transit police. but most will be with dc police. protestors are expected at various spots along the parade route. a small group of anti-abortion demonstrators picket
the swearing-in ceremonies? a family bible that belonged to his in-laws, the bible used by abraham lincoln, the bible that dr. martin luther king carried with him during his travels and hosa parks' bible that she owned as a civil rights activist? >> rosa parks. >> yes. you're right. you're right. >> wow. congratulations. okay. so that's the one that won't be, but the other three will. >> he is using the in-laws' family bible in a small ceremony on monday. he is stacking the lincoln and martin luther king bibles. >> let's go back across to kath. we have kim kardashian with us, and it's her birthday from los angeles. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well,
could fight a civil war and finish the job. president lincoln said if people see the capital calling on, it's a sign we intend the union shall go on. so congress on the money, came together, were able to complete the capitol dome in the midst of the civil war and senator schumer selected this theme nowhere challenges he faces a country now. if we look at what we accomplished 150 or so we can find faith that we can overcome these obstacles again. disable and form remarks throughout the day. it will be in the program materials distributed to folks to come to the capitol to see ceremonies and you'll see in various elements program. the day for our committee begins at about 9:00 when members say to the white house for coffee and tea with the president. senator mcconnell joins that group. from there, there is coffee with the president, vice president, first lady and dr. biden as well and everyone makes their way to the capital at about 10 or 10:30 depending on how the coffee and tea proceeds. our members come a few minutes ahead of the president, will greet the president and senator schumer
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